Upcoming Event – Grace Prescriptions

save the date website version

As a Christian medical professional, treading the waters where faith and medicine intersect can seem murky with the feeling of being ill-equipped to approach the topic of faith with patients.  Yet it is this patient–provider relationship that provides such rich ground to plant seeds of spiritual hope in patients as they face their hours of deepest hurt and fear.

On the weekend of February 6-7th, Siloam will host Grace Prescriptions – a conference designed specifically for Christian medical practitioners to become equipped to integrate their faith with their practice.  Formerly known as “The Saline Solution,” Grace Prescriptions is a training paradigm pioneered by the Christian Medical and Dental Association.  Written by Bill Peel and Dr. Walt Larimore, the curriculum is designed to explore the topic of spirituality in healthcare and equip those of us in the medical profession to integrate faith into our practice.

We invite you to come and be a part of this weekend of gathering with other Christian healthcare practitioners and their teams from around the Nashville region.  For more information, please visit our Events page as we announce further updates.

Registration opens October 6th.

How Whole-Person Care Fosters Patient Engagement

Lauren Holmgren, former 4th year ETSU medical student who completed her rotation at our clinic in March 2014

Lauren Holmgren, former 4th year ETSU medical student who completed her rotation at our clinic in March 2014

Leaving Siloam yesterday was bittersweet.  Not only was I leaving a clinic I have come to love and people who had truly made me feel like part of the team, I was leaving behind my role as a medical student.  Yesterday was the completion of my very last clinical rotation of medical school.  I will never again walk into a patient room and introduce myself as “the medical student working with….”  Instead, the next time I walk into a patient room I will introduce myself as “Dr. Holmgren”.  As I reflect back on my time at Siloam, there is no doubt in my mind that as I transition to “Dr. Holmgren,” the way I practice will be shaped by the time I spent at Siloam.  I have, somewhat selfishly, spent a lot of time this month trying to figure out what it is that allows the patients and providers at Siloam to create such a nurturing and health promoting environment because it is exactly the type of relationship I hope to one day have in my practice.

The conclusion I have come to…. it’s a combination of a number of things.  First and foremost, the providers at Siloam are interested in the whole person rather than just the medical complaints of their patients—their dedication to providing care for all aspects of a patient’s life from their medical needs to their spiritual needs to their social needs.  This focus and dedication allows the providers to make the best recommendations for their patients but that alone is not enough to care well for their patients. The patients have to take an active role in their healthcare.  The care and dedication of the providers to take care of the whole person is something patients recognize and I think that greatly contributes to patients taking an active role in their own health, but Siloam also requires their patients to be responsible for their healthcare.  I see this as a critical part of the success Siloam sees.  Patients understand that the clinic is not going to ask them to contribute more than they can afford but at the same time, the patients understand that they have to be invested in their own care.
Additionally, the patients of Siloam are a wonderful group of people.  They have a wide variety of experiences that have shaped their lives but they are all grateful for what they have and the care they receive at Siloam.  All of these things together have made an exceptional place to learn and a great place for people to get exceptional care.  I am truly grateful to have had the opportunity to be a part of such a wonderful clinic.

 

Guest blog post courtesy of Lauren Holmgren

Dr. Wills at Undercurrent – Nov. 14

One of the passions of Siloam is the integration of  faith in Jesus with our work as healers.   Whole-person health care is the result—an integrated approach to forming healing partnerships with broken people of any culture or creed.  One of the goals of the Siloam Institute is to multiply whole person care through dialogue in the community and beyond.  Unto this end, on Thursday Nov. 14, Dr. Morgan Wills will be joining two other Siloam volunteers as a panelist at an event called UnderCurrent.

UnderCurrent is a monthly  gathering designed in a TED talks format, with the intention of exploring the ideas of faith, vocation, community and culture.  UnderCurrent is hosting three events this fall, with 4 presenters at each event.  Each presenter will share a brief vignette from their own lives that relates to the theme for the month.  Join us as we explore how God calls us to “practice our faith” daily and how it impacts our work lives, our community & our stories.  November’s panel will focus on work related to health, so you won’t want to miss it!

Date: Thursday, November 14, 2013
Time: 7:00 PM
Location: The Warehouse, 1423 2nd Avenue North, Nashville TN, 37208
Reserve Your Ticket – Tickets Are Limited

Dessert & Conversation with Mary Poplin

Note from the Director–

“The Siloam Institute exists to bridge the gap between academic medicine, the faith community, and the medically underserved.  As trainees at Siloam over the years are well aware, the worldviews of the clinician and patient alike have significant, practical implications for the work of healing.

In addition to training future health professionals to engage at this level (as recounted in stories on this blog), we periodically sponsor lectures or events that foster deeper dialogue around these issues.  With that in mind, we are delighted to co-sponsor an upcoming evening event on Oct. 23rd at Vanderbilt Medical School featuring Mary Poplin, professor at Claremont College and author of Finding Calcutta and Is Reality Secular? 

Whatever your own faith background, we hope you will consider joining us for dessert and provocative discussion about how to integrate personal conviction and professional practice.”

Oct-23 Lecture Flyer

Whole-Person Health Care Event: Cases and Discussion at VUSM in February

Have you been intrigued by the issues presented on our blog this year?  Still trying to figure out what “whole- person health care” really looks like?  Would you welcome an opportunity to hear and discuss actual cases in person?

On Mondays in the month of February, The Siloam Institute will be partnering with two medical student organizations at Vanderbilt University in a series of case presentations and discussions about the realities of Whole-Person Health Care.  Below is a description provided by the student leaders of Medical Christian Fellowship:footwashing

Striving to see and care for one’s patients as the complicated human beings they are is a difficult thing in the hectic, busy environment of health care. The following series will explore the joys and challenges of practicing medicine in a way that acknowledges and addresses patients and their health problems from a holistic perspective, seeing patients as physical, emotional, and spiritual beings.

Doctors from the Nashville area will share their experiences and lessons learned and engage in discussion on this topic in the format of case presentations. The final session will consist of a primarily discussion-style forum in which participants will discuss the presented cases along with the issues and challenges they raised regarding Whole- Person Health Care, in order to glean further insight into the practical expression of caring for patients as complete human beings in the context of everyday medical practice.

The Siloam Institute of Faith, Health and Culture will be co-sponsoring this series along with the student organizations Medical Christian Fellowship (MCF) and the Society of Saints Cosmos and Damian (SSCD).

These presentations will be held for four consecutive Monday’s at 12 pm, noon in Light Hall (room 202) on the Vanderbilt Medical Campus (Nashville, TN, USA) and will last for one hour. Lunch will be provided.

February 4th–Dr. Morgan Wills, Siloam Family Health Center

February 11th–Dr. Anderson Spickard, III, Vanderbilt School of Medicine

February 25th–Dr. Morgan McDonald, Vanderbilt School of Medicine

Please direct any questions you may have to Ian McGuinness at ian.m.mcguinness@vanderbilt.edu