Home visits bring heart

Guest blogger Will Tucker, one of seven students in this summer’s Community Health Immersion, writes…

Last week I had the marvelous privilege of shadowing Lauren Smith, a Family Nurse Practitioner with Siloam Family Health Center. The experience was an enormous blessing to me and I have rarely seen a more refreshing sight during a home visit. Most of my experience with patient interaction has always been in an office setting and this was actually my first interaction in a patient’s home.

“…I have rarely seen a more refreshing sight…”

Home visits open doors to greater understanding about barriers patients face. Photo credit: medicalhometeam.com

Amazement was my initial reaction as we were welcomed into their homes and I could tell that these appointments were full of purpose and provided insight to a fundamental aspect of Siloam, whole-person care. Chelsea and I were the students able to travel to the home visit that day and we both recorded notes as the patient/practitioner dialogue transpired, some of which was in Spanish.

Walls I anticipated to be up were non-existent in the visits as conversation flowed freely in two languages. I clearly witnessed the value of language that is so applicable in everyday life and is often the form of communication we take for granted the most. Language is a cultural component that conveys along with it meanings for objects or action that cannot be accurately translated, but we were blessed to learn from Lauren its importance in action.

“…not everything can be simplified down to chemical reactions…”

We also learned to focus on other cues a patient may unintentionally give through their environment or behaviors. Through careful observation of many factors in the home a much more thorough understanding of what affects patients on a daily basis is acquired. I have heard it said many times that personal daily decisions will always factor into a person’s overall well being more so than any other factor that a medical professional can assist with and if it were not clear already, I saw with much clarity the truth in that statement.

During each visit I listened intently to the interaction occurring and made various observations about the home and various family relationships that patients had established. I was even fortunate enough to get to read a few jokes in an almanac with the husband of a patient and somewhat dip my toe into the waters of fine trust that exist between patient and practitioner as an observer.

“…I was surprised to find that hope overflowed…”

While I expected home visits to be solemn occasions, filled with despair and hardship, I was surprised to find that hope overflowed and peace persisted despite all opposing circumstances. Emotional & spiritual support was provided by family and friends, physical guidance, emotional, and spiritual support was also supplied by Lauren as she reviewed medicines and plans of action with each patient. But the most important and intriguing facet is that all of those good things were firmly rooted in Christ.

Will Tucker is a rising senior at Union University.

Will Tucker is a rising senior at Union University.

At the conclusion of each visit Lauren sought to pray with her patients and in doing so acknowledged that not everything can be simplified down to chemical reactions, treatments, careful planning, medications to solve this and that problem, but that there are somethings we do not understand yet and may not at all. While I hope that we continue to make great strides in knowledge acquisition, always acknowledging God as its source, I also pray that we never forget the anchor that we have in the love of Christ and its compelling power to peace, understanding, wisdom, and its call to be whole in Him.

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